30.8.16

Number is Ratio

Braids of resonance weave through every fractal bit in spacetime. Moduli overlap in resonance and prime superposition yielding families of functional disambiguators.


Numbers, as we know them, are ratios.
For example, 5 is 5/1 or 5:1.

We typically compare numbers sharing the same ratio: 1.
For example, the ratio 13:5 is 13/1 / 5/1, or 13/5.

This ties [the magnitude size of] ratios to the common ratio, 1.
The number 1 is special because it has linear symmetry: 1/1.

Our mathematics and calculators are not typically very good at handling very very very large numbers or ratios.
How many photons would fit between here and the furthest human-made satellite?
An exact number, extremely large, changing every instant.


Use another common ratio that is self-similar, Φ:φ.
This number is also special because it also has binary symmetry, although curved.
This curve can then be used to compare curvatures, and preserve magnitudes exactly even when using infinitely large numbers or infinitely small.
The shape of the curve is used to make extremely large leaps of magnitude and fix inaccuracies at infinitely small scales.


We would probably only measure things close to our scale, from the universal to the Plank, sub-quantum and algorithmic scales and everything in between, like the size of our bodies or vehicles.
Further, we could use the current date and time as one of the numbers to preserve our scale of time as it moves. In essence, the ratio between any number and the present time, compared to the common ratio, yields a number to iterate until a limit (of time).



Braids of resonance weave through every fractal bit in spacetime. Moduli overlap in resonance and prime superposition yielding families of multidimensional disambiguators.

1 comment:

Robbie Coleman said...

On a scale of 1 to 10, I give this a 10:1